2007 SOVEREIGN SN 177
MAKE OFFER
2008 CITATION CJ3 SN 231
$4,495,000 USD
2001 CITATION CJ1 SN 469
$1,495,000 USD
2009 MUSTANG SN 261
MAKE OFFER
2007 MUSTANG SN 46
MAKE OFFER
1998 CITATION VII SN 7088
$1,495,000 USD
1992 CITATION VI SN 223
$1,495,000 USD
1999 CITATION BRAVO SN 870
MAKE OFFER
1999 CITATION CJ-525 SN 346
$1,300,000 USD
1978 CITATION I/SP SN 69
$480,000 USD
CESSNA CITATION JET PERFORMANCE AT A GLANCE PAX = Typical Passenger Configuration        CABINV = Cabin Volume in Cubic Feet        CABINH = Cabin Height in Feet        BAGV = Baggage Volume (Interior/Exterior) in Cubic Feet        PAY - Payload with Full Fuel (lbs)        MTOW = Max Take Off Weight (lbs)        CRUISE = Normal Cruise Speed (kts)        RANGE = NBAA IFR Range with Seats Full (NM)    GPH = Gallons per hour            AIRCRAFT         PAX  CABINV CABINH BAGV   PAY    MTOW   CRUISE IFR RANGE   GPH Citation Mustang   4   144   4.5    6/57   600    8,645    340     716 Citation I/SP      5   205   4.3    40/17  820    11,850   345     910 Citation Jet 525   5   186   4.8    4/51   330    10,400   365     750 Citation CJ1       5   198   4.75   8/51   430    10,600   380     775 Citation CJ2       6   248   4.75   4/70   668    12,375   415     1,075 Citation CJ3       6   283   4.8    4/70   700    13,870   420     1,488 Citation CJ4       7   311   4.8    6/71   1000   16,950   454     1,802 Citation II        7   263   4.7    36/41  680    14,100   360     1,220 Citation II Bravo  7   278   4.7    28/46  801    14,800   405     1,290 Citation S/II      7   263   4.7    36/41  697    15,100   386     1,430 Citation III/VI    7   438   5.7    0/61   1,071  22,000   465     1,770 Citation VII       7   438   5.7    0/54   1,620  23,000   452     1,693 Citation V         7   292   4.8    26/41  930    15,900   395     1,220 Citation V Ultra   7   292   4.8    26/41  779    16,300   400     1,259 Citation Encore    7   307   4.8    26/43  905    16,630   430     1,410 Citation Excel     7   461   5.7    10/80  960    20,000   433     1,550 Citation XLS       8   461   5.7    10/80  1,090  20,200   430     1,560     215 Citation X         8   593   5.7    0/82   1,462  35,700   525     2,890     345 Citation Sovereign 9   620   5.7    35/100 1,234  30,000   459     2,643     240 Information   provided   as   a   courtesy   to   clients   of   OMNI   JET   TRADING.   It   is   based   upon   the   best available   information.   However,   many   figures   are   based   upon   estimates   or   variable   conditions   and we do not warrant it for accuracy and it should not be used for flight planning purposes. Use only an approved flight manual for the aircraft.
CESSNA CITATION AIRCRAFT HISTORY SOVEREIGN + (2014 to present) In   2014,   Cessna   upgraded   the   Sovereign   to   the   new   Sovereign+   which   included   new   Garmin   avionics   and   a blended winglet. SOVEREIGN (2004 to 2014 - SN 680-001 to SN 680-0520) In   the   late   1990s,   Cessna   saw   the   need   for   a   high-performance   jet   midway   between   the   Excel/XLS   size   and the    Citation    X.    The    result    was    the    Model    680    Citation    Sovereign.    The    Sovereign    is    considered    a transcontinental   aircraft   with   the   capability   to   fly   Los   Angeles   to   Hawaii.   The   Sovereign   is   a   new   aircraft that   combines   a   slightly   modified   Citation   X   cabin,   with   a   brand   new   swept   supercritical   wing.   The Sovereign   is   equipped   with   two   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW-306C   engines   which   provide   5,600   lbs   of   thrust   each on   takeoff.   The   Sovereign   has   a   Honeywell   Epic   LCD   avionics   suite,   TCAS   and   EGPWS.   The   Sovereign’s cabin   is   25.3   feet   long   and   can   hold      anywhere   between   eight   and   twelve   180-degree   swivel   seats.      The interior   is   large   enough   that   passengers      can   stand   up   in   the   5.7   foot-high   cabin.      The   baggage   space available   in   the   Sovereign   is   the   largest   of   comparable   private   jets.   The   Sovereign   has   135   cubic   feet   of baggage      space   (about   1000   pounds).   It   can   take   off   in   under   4,000   feet,   a   feat      still   unmatched   by   other midsized jets, and can cruise at around .75 Mach (458 knots). CITATION X+ (2013 - present - SN 750-501 and higher) The   latest   version   of   the   Citation   X   is   named   the   Citation   X+   and   includes   upgraded   engines,   Garmin   5000 avionics and winglets. CITATION X (1996 to 2013 - SN 750-0001 to SN 750-0313) The   Citation   X   is   one   of   Cessna's   largest,   fastest   and   longest-range   aircraft   and   is   recognized   as   the   fastest business   jet   in   current   production.   The   Citation   X   has   a   cabin   that   is   five   feet   longer   with   greater   head   and shoulder   room   than   that   of   the   Citation   III.   The   Citation   X   comes   with   FADEC   equipped   Rolls-Royce   AE 3007C1   engines   that   produce   6,000   pounds   of   thrust   each.   The   Citation   X   also   has   a   new   technology   wing with   a   sweep   of   37°.   It   has   a   Honeywell   Primus   2000   EFIS   avionics   suite   with   five   color   LCD   displays.   A   few notable   upgrades   occurred   over   the   production   cycle   of   the   Citation   X.   Effective   with   serial   number   101,   the electrical   systems   was   redesigned   as   a   “split   bus”   system   to   increase   reliability.   Effective   with   serial number 173, the engines were upgraded to increase thrust by 5%. CITATION XLS+ ( 2008 to 2013 - SN 560-6002 to SN 560-6163) Cessna   introduced   the   Citation   XLS+   in   2006.   The   XLS+   replaces   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   Avionics   suite with   the   Rockwell   Collins   Pro-Line   21   Avionics   Package.   The   engines   were   also   improved   with   P&W   545C turbofan engines that now have FADEC installed. CITATION XLS ( 2004 to 2009 - SN 560-5501 to SN 560-5830) The   Citation   XLS   is   a   Citation   Excel,   with   more   payload,   improved   PW545B   engines   and   improved   range. The   model   560-XL   Citation   XLS   combines   a   shortened   Citation   X   cabin   with   a   modified   Citation   V   wing.   Its two   P&W   PW545B   turbofan   engines   provide   330   NM   more   range   and   19   knots   faster   normal   cruise   speed than the Citation Excel. The cabin provides comfortable seating for seven passengers. CITATION EXCEL (1998 to 2004 - SN 560-5001 to SN 560-05372) The   Citation   Excel   combines   a   shortened   Citation   X   cabin   that   seats   seven   with   a   modified   Citation   V   Ultra wing.   The   Excel   is   equipped   with   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW545A   engines   that   have   Nordam   thrust   reversers.   The Excel   is   equipped   with   a   Honeywell   Primus   1000   EFIS   avionics   package   and   has   a   range   of   about   1,700   NM. The   Excel   offers   the   same   cabin   height   as   the   Citation   X   yet   retains   the   same   short   field   performance   and economics   of   the   Ultra.   The   addition   of   an   APU   is   an   option.   The   Excel’s   first   flight   was   on   February   29, 1996.   Certification   was   received   in   1998.   The   aircraft   was   in   production   until   2004,   when   the   Citation   XLS replaced it. CITATION ENCORE+ (2005 to 2010 - SN 560-0751 to SN 560-0815) Compared   to   the   Citation   Encore,   the   Encore   +   offers   improvements   and   upgrades   in   almost   every   area   of an   aircraft   including   the   engines,      avionics,   cabin   interior,   and   performance.      When   compared   to   its predecessor,   the   Encore+      has   a   340-lb   net   payload   increase   and   higher   maximum   takeoff   weight;   longer     wings   and   aerodynamic   capabilities;   and   adhesive   metal   bonding   in   place   of      vulnerable   and   expensive   to replace   mechanical   fasteners.   The   Encore+   is   powered   by   two   pylon-mounted   PW535B      engines.      They produce   3,400   pounds   of      thrust   and   incorporate   a   FADEC   to   reduce   pilot   workload.      The   major   inspection interval   is   5,000      hours.   A   Rockwell   Collins   Pro   Line   21system   replaces   the   Encore’s      Honeywell   Primus 1000.      The   upgraded   Pro      Line   boasts   single-channel   autopilot   with   dual   channel   flight   guidance   system,     3D   navigation   Flight   Management   System   FMS-3000   and   Communication   Navigation      Surveillance   (CNS) radios.         Three   8×10   matrix   LCD   screens   and   a   Garmin   GPS   500   display   cockpit      information.      The   new avionics   suite   is      also   lighter   in   weight,   improving   the   payload   capability   to   1,170   lbs   with   full      tanks.   The Encore+   has   a   maximum   takeoff   weight   of      16,830   lbs,   and   its   maximum   payload   is   2,310   lbs.      Its   certified flight ceiling is at 45,000  feet.  The aircraft has a high speed  cruise of 426 knots. CITATION ENCORE (2000 to 2006 - SN 560-0539 to SN 560-0707) The   Citation   Encore   is   a   Citation   Ultra   with   upgraded   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW535   engines   that   produce   3,400 pounds   of   thrust   each   compared   to   the   Ultra’s   3,045   pounds   of   thrust.   This   is   an   increase   of   355   pounds   of thrust   for   each   engine.   There   is   no   big   change   in   performance   but   engine   costs   drop   almost   20%   and   fuel costs   drop   8%.   The   Encore   has   the   same   Honeywell   Primus   1000   EFIS   avionics   suite   used   in   the   Ultra.   The Encore   was   certified   in   2000   and   remained   in   production   until   2006,   when   the   Encore+   superseded   it.   The Cessna   Citation   Encore   can   takeoff   from   a   sea   level   runway   in   3,490   feet.   The   required   runway   distance increases   to   5,750   feet   at   an   altitude   of   5,000   feet   and   a   temperature   of   77°F.         Not   only   is   the   Encore quick   on   takeoff,   it   is   pretty   fast   at   45,000   feet   as   well.      In   thirteen   minutes,   it   climbs   to   37,000   feet, where   it   can   reach   its   maximum   cruise   speed   of   .74   Mach.      For   a   long   range   cruise,   it   flies   at   376   knots   at its   maximum   certified   flight   level   of   45,000   feet.   The   wings   allow   the   Encore   to   land   on   runways   as   short   as 2,439   feet   and   take   off   in   3,490   feet   when   loaded   to   its   maximum   takeoff   weight   of   16,630   pounds.   It   uses a   trailing   link   landing   gear   for   smooth   taxiing   and   soft   landings,   and   can   be   single-pilot   operated.      A   new forced   mixer   nozzle   cuts   engine   noise,   and   new   fuel   heaters   have   been   added   that   eliminate   the   need   to mix   anti-icing   additives   with   the   fuel.      Other   small   updates   allow   the   Encore   to   carry   344   fewer   pounds   of fuel and still have a longer range than the Ultra. CITATION ULTRA (1994 to 1999 - SN 560-0260 to SN  560-0538) Based   on   the   Citation   V,   the   Ultra   features   more   powerful   Pratt   &   Whitney   JT15D5D   engines   with   145 pounds   of   additional   thrust.   The   extra   thrust   allows   a   take   off   gross   weight   increase   of   400   pounds,   39 nautical   miles   of   increased   range,   and   a   30-knot   increase   in   normal   cruise   speed.   The   flight   deck   is equipped   with   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   EFIS   avionics   suite.   The   cabin,   which   can   hold   eight   passengers, stretches   to   seventeen   feet,   five   inches   –   the   longest   cabin   of   any   light   private   jet.      The   strategic   use   of seamless   wall   panels,   indirect   lights,   and   mirrors   make   the   cabin   seem   even   more   spacious.      Passengers enjoy   the   cabins   equipped   with   individual   flat   panel   entertainment   systems   and   audio   jacks   (an   optional feature).      The   Ultra   has   storage   space   for   twenty-six   cubic   feet   of   baggage,   or   about   six   hundred   pounds worth   of   golf   bags,   suitcases,   or   whatever   else   worth   bringing   along.   Arguably   the   best   selling   point   of   the Ultra   is   its   short   takeoff   distance.      The   Ultra   can   complete   a   takeoff   in   just   3,200   feet   while   loaded   to   its maximum   takeoff   weight   of   16,300   pounds.      Not   only   is   the   Ultra   quick   on   takeoff,   but   it   is   pretty   fast   at   a cruise   altitude   of   37,000   feet   as   well.      It   has   a   maximum   cruise   speed   of   426   knots.   The   Ultra’s   speed   can be   attributed   largely   to   its   wing   design.      Adhering   to   the   Citation   line’s   tradition   of   simplicity   in   design   and operation,    it    uses    the    fastest    straight    wing    design    that    the    Citation    line    has    ever    seen.        Two aerodynamicists,   one   from   Cessna   and   one   from   NASA,   collaborated   to   redesign   the   Citation   line’s   standard straight   wing.      The   result   was   a   wing   with   a   large   leading-edge   radius   and   a   level   upper   surface,   which better   distributed   air   flow,   cut   drag,   and   increased   the   Ultra’s   cruise   speed   by   .08   mach   (46   knots).   Each engine   provides   the   Ultra   with   3,045   pounds   of   thrust.   The   engineers   of   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   suite realized   the   importance   of   details   like   consolidating   multiple   displays   into   a   few,   easy-to-interpret   ones   and placing   screens   close   to   the   controls   to   which   they   apply.      The   predecessor   of   the   Ultra   had   a   confusing array   of   five   screens   and   more   than   eight   analog   controls.      The   Ultra   consolidated   the   mess   into   four   sleek screens.      The   relevant   controls   are   located   directly   on   the   screens’   faceplates   to   improve   pilot   hand-eye coordination and flight performance. Single Point refueling standard after SN 290. CITATION V (1989 to 1994 - SN 560-0001 to SN 560-0259) The   Citation   V   is   a   stretched   version   of   the   Citation   II   with   a   cabin   that   is   18   inches   longer   and   a   six   inch longer   wing   span.   This   increase   in   cabin   length   added   20   cubic   feet   of   cabin   volume.      The   Pratt   and Whitney   JT15D-5A   engines   produce   3,045   pounds   of   thrust   and   longer   wings   increase   fuel   capacity   by   167 pounds.   The   Citation   V   has   a   fine   blend   of   cabin   comfort,   performance,   and   reliability.      It   is   a   good   choice for   short   trips.   The   engineers   of   the   Citation   V   took   advantage   of   the   extra   cabin   space   and   installed   extra- wide   seats   that   recline   60   degrees   and   rotate   a   full   360   degrees.   The   Citation   V   isn’t   just   roomy   inside, however:   it   has   an   external   baggage   capacity   of   46   cubic   feet   and   an   internal   capacity   of   28   cubic   feet.      In other   words,   this   private   jet   can   haul   about   seven   suitcases   and   three   golf   bags,   depending   on   the   specific jet   configuration   and   amount   of   passengers.      Cessna   spent   considerable   time   on   sound   control   in   its   design of   the   Citation   V,   using   new   soundproofing   techniques   and   triple-glazed   windows.      The   result   is   one   of   the quietest   light   private   jets   available.   Other   notable   features   include   the   two-zone   temperature   control   and the   ventilation   system   designed   to   eliminate   drafts.   The   cabin   pressurization   system   can   hold   a   sea   level cabin   to   23,580   feet,   which   is   useful   when   flying   at   a   high   speed   (425   knots/hour)   cruise   at   37,000   feet,   or at   a   long   range   (350   knots/hour)   cruise   at   the   Citation   V’s   maximum   certified   flight   ceiling   of   45,000   feet.     Takeoff   distances   are   fairly   short.      At   sea   level,   the   Citation   V   can   take   off   in   3,160   feet.   At   an   altitude   of 5,000   feet   and   a   temperature   of   77°F,   the   required   runway   distance   increases   to   4,780   feet.   Pilots   aren’t the   only   ones   that   can   appreciate   the   performance   capabilities   of   the   Citation   V.      Its   average   cruise   speed of   415   knots   per   hour   makes   it   a   popular   choice   for   350   to   400   mile   trips.   The   Citation   V   is   known   as   a pilot-friendly   jet,   which   also   means   an   exceptionally   safe   one.      Its   pre-flight   check   is   easy   to   carry   out,   with its   organization   designed   with   the   pilots   in   mind.      The   jet   handles   well,   especially   in   normal   maneuvers   and the   landing   approach   configuration.      The   cockpit   visibility   of   340   degrees   is   unmatched   by   any   other   light private   jets   in   its   class,   and   managers   and   mechanics   alike   have   repeatedly   praised   its   reliability.   In   short, the   Citation   V   virtues   are   comfort,   performance,   and   reliability.      It   comes   as   no   surprise   that   it   is consistently chosen over other private jets in its class
CITATION CJ4 ( 2009 to 2014 - SN 525C-001 to 525C–0152) The   CJ4’s   first   flight   was   accomplished   on   May   5th,   2008.   Certification   came   in   March   2010.   Like   the   rest   of the   CJ   family   the   CJ4   is   single   pilot   certified.   The   wing   has   been   redesigned,   compared   to   the   CJ3’s   wing, incorporating   many   features   of   the   Cessna   Sovereign’s   wing.   The   CJ4   normally   seats   6   or   7   but   can   seat   up to   8   passengers.   Interior   compliments   include   a   lavatory   and   refreshment   center.   The   CJ4   has   the   Pro   Line 21   avionics   Suite   with   FMS   (flight   management   System),   WAAS   (wide   area   augmentation   system)   and   IFIS (integrated   flight   information   system).   Along   with   the   avionics   upgrade   comes   a   Rockwell   Collins   Venue   cabin management   system   which   controls   the   entertainment   system   as   well   as   the   environmental   system.   The Venue   system   also   provides   Blu-ray   DVD   capability   with   Hi-Definition   monitors,   moving   maps   and   XM   Radio. Williams FJ44-4A FADEC engines provide 3,600 lbs of thrust each. CITATION CJ3 ( 2004 to 2013 - SN 525B-001 to 525B-0409) The   CJ3,   in   size,   cost,   and   performance,   fits   in   a   narrow   niche   between   the   Citation   Bravo   and   CJ2.   The   CJ3 is   a   CJ2   with   a   two-foot   stretch   to   the   cabin   length   allowing   standard   seating   for   six   in   a   center   club configuration.   The   CJ3   can   also   have   a   private   lavatory   with   pocket   doors,   made   possible   by   the   lengthened fuselage.   Like   the   CJ2,   the   CJ3   features   the   Collins   Pro   Line   21   avionics   suite.   In   the   CJ3,   the   copilot   position comes   with   the   primary   flight   display   as   standard.   The   CJ3   has   upgraded   Williams   FJ44-3A   engines   that produce   2,780   pounds   of   thrust.   Certification   was   received   in   mid-2004   with   deliveries   following   shortly thereafter. CITATION CJ2 ( 2000 to 2013 - SN 525A-0001 to 525A-0523) The   CJ2   is   a   CJ1   with   almost   a   three-foot   stretch   to   the   cabin   length   allowing   standard   seating   for   six.   Like the   CJ1   it   features   Collins   Pro   Line   21   EFIS   avionics,   plus   upgraded   Williams   FJ44-2C   engines   that   produce 2,400   pounds   of   thrust.   It   is   certificated   for   single   pilot   operation.   The   CJ2   was   certificated   in   2000   and   was in   production   until   2005,   when   the   CJ2+   took   its   place   in   the   production   line-up.   The   CJ2+   continues   the   “+” of   the   CJ   line   in   adding   enhancements   and   upgraded   Collins   Pro   Line   21   such   as   found   in   the   CJ3.   The   FADEC controlled   FJ44-3A-24   engines   of   the   CJ2+   offer   improved   efficiency   and   better   performance   at   altitude compared   to   the   CJ2.   Take-off   gross   weight   is   also   increased   versus   the   CJ2.   Other   improvements   include LED lighting in the cabin, redesigned seats, and updated cabin appointments. CITATION M2 ( 2012 to 2015 - SN 525-0800 to 525-0875) The   original   Model   525   CitationJet   was   launched   in   1989.   The   M2   was   launched   in   September   2011   and   it was   described   as   a   new   light   business   jet.   The   M2   is   based   on   the   CJ1   variant   and   has   similar   avionics,   a   new cabin   layout,   and   a   more-efficient   version   of   the   William   FJ44   engine.   The   M2   first   flew   on   9   March   2012.   The Citation   M2   is   a   low-wing   cantilever   monoplane   with   retractable   tricycle   landing   gear,   a   pressurized   cabin,   a T-tail,   and   is   powered   by   two   Williams   FJ44-1AP-21   turbofan   engines   and   equipped   with   Garmin   G3000 avionics. CITATION CJ1 ( 2000 to 2010 - SN 525-0360 to 525-0701) Evolutionary   improvements   to   the   Citation   Jet   525   led   to   the   development   of   the   CJ1   in   1999.   The   CJ1   has   a 200-pound   higher   maximum   take-off   weight.   Engine   improvements   give   the   CJ1   slightly   increased   range, better   take-off   performance,   and   a   few   more   knots   cruise   speed   compared   to   the   Citation   Jet.   The   CJ1   was   in production    until    2005,    when    it    was    superseded    by    the    CJ1+.    The    CJ1+    continued    the    process    of improvements   to   the   “CJ”   line   with   further   enhancements   to   the   engine   with   two   FJ   44-1AP   engines   and somewhat   higher   weights.   Also   added   is   an   upgraded   Collins   Pro   Line   21   such   as   found   in   the   CJ3.   Other improvements   include   LED   lighting   in   the   cabin,   redesigned   seats,   and   updated   cabin   appointments.   First flight of the CJ1+ was October 2004 with certification and deliveries commencing in 2005.   CITATIONJET 525 ( 1991 to 2000 - SN 525-0001 to 525-0359) The   highly   successful   Citation   Jet   was   developed   as   a   replacement   for   the   Citation   and   Citation   I.   The CitationJet   is   an   updated   version   of   the   Citation   500.   The   fuselage   is   the   same   but   it   has   a   new   T-tail   and   a new   supercritical   laminar   flow   wing.   The   Citation   Jet   is   equipped   with   Williams   Rolls   FJ44   engines   with   paddle thrust reversers. First flight of the Citation Jet occurred on April 29, 1991. CITATION MUSTANG ( 2006 to 2014 - SN 510-0001 to 510-0455) The   Cessna   Citation   Mustang,   Model   510,   is   a   very   light   jet   (VLJ)   class   business   jet   which   will   carry   four passenger   seats   in   the   aft   cabin,   a   toilet   and   seating   for   two   in   the   cockpit.   Like   most   other   light   jets,   the Mustang   is   approved   for   single-pilot   operation.   The   Model   510   Mustang   first   flew   in   April   2005.   The   airplane received   full   type   certification   from   the   Federal   Aviation   Administration   in   September   2006.   The   Mustang   is   a low-wing   cantilever   monoplane   with   a   swept   wing,   T-tail   and   tricycle   retractable   landing   gear.   The   airframe   is primarily   of   aluminum   alloy   construction,   with   a   three   spar   wing.   Power   is   provided   by   two   Pratt   &   Whitney Canada PW615F turbofan engines and avionics are the Garmin G1000 package.  CITATION VII (1992 to 2000 - SN 650-0701 to SN 650-7119) The   Citation   VII   is   a   Citation   III   with   4,000-pound   thrust   Honeywell   TFE   731-4   engines.   The   Citation   VII   has 77   miles   less   range   than   the   Citation   III   with   slightly   better   field   performance.   The   cruise   speed   is   eight knots   faster   than   the   Citation   III.   The   Citation   VII   went   out   of   production   in   2000   after   producing   119   units. The first Citation VII prototype flew in February 1991 CITATION III / VI  (1983 to 1955 - SN 650-0001 to SN 650-0238) The   Citation   III   was   Cessna’s   first   entry   into   the   medium   jet   market   and   was   designed   to   supplement   the much   smaller   Citation   I   and   II.   The   new   design   features   a   swept   supercritical   wing   for   high-speed   long-range flight,   new   Honeywell   TFE   731   turbofans,   a   T-tail,   and   a   new   fuselage.   The   389   cubic   foot   cabin   provides seating for seven, a galley, and an aft lavatory. The Citation III’s first flight was on May 30, 1979. CITATION BRAVO (1997 to 2006 - SN  550-0801 to SN 550-1136) By   1994,   the   Citation   II   and   S/II   had   been   in   production   for   10   years,   and   it   was   time   to   integrate   new technology.   Cessna   thus   announced   the   development   of   the   Citation   Bravo.   While   it   was   built   on   the   basic Citation   II   airframe,   the   new   aircraft   was   powered   by   more   powerful   and   fuel   efficient   Pratt   &   Whitney Canada   PW530A   engines   resulting   in   a   higher   MGTOW,   faster   cruise   speed   and   longer   ranger.   The   main landing   gear   was   replaced   by   the   smoother-riding   trailing   link   configuration   adopted   by   other   members   of   the Citation   line,   and   the   standard   avionics   suite   was   updated   to   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   glass   cockpit   and AlliedSignal   CNI-5000   Silver   Crown   panel-mounted   radios.   The   new   aircraft   first   flew   on   April   25,   1995,   but certification   did   not   come   for   over   a   year,   finally   being   granted   in   August   1996.[2]   Production   of   the   Bravo ceased   in   late   2006   after   337   had   been   produced.   An   advanced   avionics   suite   includes   a   Honeywell   Primus 1000   flight   guidance   system      This   aircraft   can   be   RVSM   certified   when   Service   Bulletin   SB-550-34-70   is complied with. The Bravo can climb to a maximum flight level of 45,000 feet. CITATION S/II  ( 1984 to 1988 - SN S550-0001 to S550-0160) In   October,   1983,   Cessna   announced   that   they   would   be   improving   the   Citation   II   with   the   upgraded   Model S550   Citation   S/II.   Its   first   flight   was   in   February   1984.   The   S/II   could   seat   a   maximum   of   11   people.   The aircraft   utilized   an   improved   version   of   the   engine,   JT15D-4B   (2,500   lbf   (11   kN)   of   thrust).   The   "B"   in   the engine   model   number   consists   of   components   in   the   hot   section   being   replaced   with   components   sustaining higher   IT   temperatures   which   in   turn   allows   for   a   higher   N1   percentage   of   106%,   a   full   2%   more   than   the JT15D-4   engines   installed   on   the   Citation   II.   The   main   benefit   of   the   percent   increase   provided   more   thrust at   higher   altitudes.   Fuel   capacity   was   increased   to   a   total   of   5820   lbs.   The   rest   of   the   improvements   were aerodynamic   in   nature.   The   wing   was   replaced   with   one   using   a   supercritical   airfoil,   which   had   been developed   for   the   Citation   III.   The   leading   edges   of   the   wing   and   tail   used   TKS   type   anti-icing   fluid   in addition   to   bleed   air   used   for   the   engines.   Once   certification   was   in   hand,   the   S/II   replaced   the   II   in   the product   line   in   late   1984.   However,   due   to   market   demands,   the   II   was   returned   to   production   in   1987.   The S/II   was   discontinued   after   the   1988   production   year.   The   number   of   S/II's   produced   is   (approximate)   160. The II continued in production until 1994, and was replaced by the Bravo in 1997. CITATION II ( 1977 to 1994 - SN 550-0001 to 550-0733) The   Citation   II,   Model   550,   was   a   direct   development   from   the   Citation   I.   The   earlier   aircraft's   success   in   the market   led   Cessna   to   believe   there   was   demand   for   a   larger   aircraft   that   utilized   the   same   design   philosophy. The   result   was   the   Citation   II,   which   had   a   maximum   seating   capacity   of   10.   In   addition   to   more   seats,   the plane   had   more   powerful   JT15D-4   engines   (2,500   lbf   (11   kN)   thrust   per   engine),   increase   of   fuel   capacity   to approximately   5000   lbs,   faster   speeds   and   longer   range.   First   flight   was   in   January   1977,   and   the   aircraft was   certified   for   two-pilot   operation   in   March,   1978.   A   total   of   603   aircraft   were   built   before   the   Citation   II was   replaced   by   the   Bravo   in   the   production   line.   Like   the   Citation   I/SP,   the   Model   551   Citation   II/SP   was launched   as   Cessna's   means   of   competing   in   the   turboprop   market,   which   predominantly   are   operated single-pilot, so the aircraft was re-certified for single-pilot operations. CITATION I/SP ( 1977 to 1985 - SN 501-0001 to 501-0689) In   1976,   several   product   improvements   were   added   to   the   Citation   500   in   response   to   market   pressures, including   a   longer   span   wing   (47   ft   1   in   vs   43   ft   11   in),   higher   maximum   gross   weight   and   thrust   reversers, which   made   shorter   landing   fields   available   to   customers.   With   these   improvements   came   the   name   Citation I.   Like   the   Learjets,   the   Citation   I   required   a   crew   of   two.   But   since   the   Citation   was   intended   to   be   marketed against   twin   turboprops,   which   can   be   flown   by   a   single   pilot,   this   restriction   limited   its   intended   market. Cessna's   answer   was   the   Model   501   Citation   I/SP,   with   SP   referring   to   its   certified   single-pilot   capability. When   production   on   the   Citation   I   finally   ended   in   1985,   377   airframes   had   been   built.   The   aircraft   was   later superseded by the Cessna CitationJet. CITATION 500 ( 1972 to 1977 - SN 500-0001 to 500-0349) After   a   longer-than-expected   development   flight   test   program,   the   Citation   (Model   500)   and   received   its   FAA certification   in   September,   1971.   The   aircraft   was   powered   by   two   Pratt   &   Whitney   Canada   JT15D-1   turbofan engines.   With   fan   engines,   rather   than   turbojet   engines   such   as   powered   the   contemporary   Learjet   25,   and straight,   rather   than   swept   wings,   the   Citation   was   over   120   knots   (220   km/h)   slower   than   the   Lear   25   (max speed of 350 knots (650 km/h) compared with 473 knots (876 km/h) for the LJ25).
CITATION JETS FOR SALE OMNI International Jet Trading
Jet Sales & Acquisitions since 1963
2000 CITATION EXCEL SN 5125
$2,700,000 USD
2004 SOVEREIGN SN 21
$5,300,000 USD
Omni   International   Jet   Trading   is   an   industry   leading   source   for   quality   pre-owned   Cessna   Citation   jets   for sale.   The   Citation   jets   offered   for   sale   on   the   following   pages   are   represented   and   offered   by   Omni.   We would   be   pleased   to   send   you   more   details   on   any   on   these   fine   aircraft.   Should   you   not   see   type   of   jet aircraft   you   are   looking   for,   feel   free   to   call   us   and   we   will   find   it   for   you.   We   focus   on   presenting   the   best aircraft at the best price.
Home Aircraft For Sale Services About Us Links Contact Us CITATION JETS FOR SALE
Omni   International   Jet   Trading   is   an   industry   leading source   for   quality   pre-owned   Cessna   Citation   jets   for sale.   We   focus   on   presenting   the   best   aircraft   at   the   best price.
OMNI International Jet Trading
© Copyright 1963 - 2016
www.omnijet.com  +1 410 820 7300
Washington DC| Paris | London | Sao Paulo | Miami | Phoenix | Mexico City | Indianapolis | Mumbai | Los Angeles
2007 SOVEREIGN SN 177
MAKE OFFER
2008 CITATION CJ3 SN 231
$4,495,000 USD
2001 CITATION CJ1 SN 469
$1,495,000 USD
2009 MUSTANG SN 261
MAKE OFFER
2007 MUSTANG SN 46
MAKE OFFER
1998 CITATION VII SN 7088
$1,495,000 USD
1992 CITATION VI SN 223
$1,495,000 USD
1999 CITATION BRAVO SN 870
MAKE OFFER
1999 CITATION CJ-525 SN 346
$1,300,000 USD
1978 CITATION I/SP SN 69
$480,000 USD
OMNI International Jet Trading
2000 CITATION EXCEL SN 5125
$2,995,000
2004 SOVEREIGN SN 21
$5,300,000 USD
2008 CITATION CJ3 SN 231
$4,495,000 USD
2007 SOVEREIGN SN 177
MAKE OFFER
2009 MUSTANG SN 261
MAKE OFFER
2007 MUSTANG SN 46
MAKE OFFER
2001 CITATION CJ1 SN 469
$1,495,000 USD
1998 CITATION VII SN 7088
$1,495,000 USD
1992 CITATION VI SN 223
$1,495,000 USD
1999 CITATION BRAVO SN 870
MAKE OFFER
1999 CITATION CJ-525 SN 346
$1,300,000 USD
1978 CITATION I/SP SN 69
$480,000 USD
CESSNA CITATION JET PERFORMANCE AT A GLANCE PAX = Typical Passenger Configuration        CABINV = Cabin Volume in Cubic Feet        CABINH = Cabin Height in Feet        BAGV = Baggage Volume (Interior/Exterior) in Cubic Feet        PAY - Payload with Full Fuel (lbs)        MTOW = Max Take Off Weight (lbs)        CRUISE = Normal Cruise Speed (kts)        RANGE = NBAA IFR Range with Seats Full (NM)    GPH = Gallons per hour             AIRCRAFT         PAX  CABINV CABINH BAGV   PAY    MTOW   CRUISE IFR RANGE   GPH Citation Mustang   4   144   4.5    6/57   600    8,645    340     716 Citation I/SP      5   205   4.3    40/17  820    11,850   345     910 Citation Jet 525   5   186   4.8    4/51   330    10,400   365     750 Citation CJ1       5   198   4.75   8/51   430    10,600   380     775 Citation CJ2       6   248   4.75   4/70   668    12,375   415     1,075 Citation CJ3       6   283   4.8    4/70   700    13,870   420     1,488 Citation CJ4       7   311   4.8    6/71   1000   16,950   454     1,802 Citation II        7   263   4.7    36/41  680    14,100   360     1,220 Citation II Bravo  7   278   4.7    28/46  801    14,800   405     1,290 Citation S/II      7   263   4.7    36/41  697    15,100   386     1,430 Citation III/VI    7   438   5.7    0/61   1,071  22,000   465     1,770 Citation VII       7   438   5.7    0/54   1,620  23,000   452     1,693 Citation V         7   292   4.8    26/41  930    15,900   395     1,220 Citation V Ultra   7   292   4.8    26/41  779    16,300   400     1,259 Citation Encore    7   307   4.8    26/43  905    16,630   430     1,410 Citation Excel     7   461   5.7    10/80  960    20,000   433     1,550 Citation XLS       8   461   5.7    10/80  1,090  20,200   430     1,560     215 Citation X         8   593   5.7    0/82   1,462  35,700   525     2,890     345 Citation Sovereign 9   620   5.7    35/100 1,234  30,000   459     2,643     240 Information    provided    as    a    courtesy    to    clients    of    OMNI    JET    TRADING.    It    is    based    upon    the    best    available information.   However,   many   figures   are   based   upon   estimates   or   variable   conditions   and   we   do   not   warrant   it   for accuracy and it should not be used for flight planning purposes. Use only an approved flight manual for the aircraft.
CESSNA CITATION AIRCRAFT HISTORY SOVEREIGN + (2014 to present) In 2014, Cessna upgraded the Sovereign to the new Sovereign+ which included new Garmin avionics and a blended winglet. SOVEREIGN (2004 to 2014 - SN 680-001 to SN 680-0520) In   the   late   1990s,   Cessna   saw   the   need   for   a   high-performance   jet   midway   between   the   Excel/XLS   size   and   the   Citation   X.   The result   was   the   Model   680   Citation   Sovereign.   The   Sovereign   is   considered   a   transcontinental   aircraft   with   the   capability   to   fly   Los Angeles   to   Hawaii.   The   Sovereign   is   a   new   aircraft   that   combines   a   slightly   modified   Citation   X   cabin,   with   a   brand   new   swept supercritical   wing.   The   Sovereign   is   equipped   with   two   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW-306C   engines   which   provide   5,600   lbs   of   thrust   each on   takeoff.   The   Sovereign   has   a   Honeywell   Epic   LCD   avionics   suite,   TCAS   and   EGPWS.   The   Sovereign’s   cabin   is   25.3   feet   long and   can   hold      anywhere   between   eight   and   twelve   180-degree   swivel   seats.      The   interior   is   large   enough   that   passengers      can stand   up   in   the   5.7   foot-high   cabin.      The   baggage   space   available   in   the   Sovereign   is   the   largest   of   comparable   private   jets.   The Sovereign   has   135   cubic   feet   of   baggage      space   (about   1000   pounds).   It   can   take   off   in   under   4,000   feet,   a   feat      still   unmatched by other midsized jets, and can cruise at around .75 Mach (458 knots). CITATION X+ (2013 - present - SN 750-501 and higher) The latest version of the Citation X is named the Citation X+ and includes upgraded engines, Garmin 5000 avionics and winglets. CITATION X (1996 to 2013 - SN 750-0001 to SN 750-0313) The   Citation   X   is   one   of   Cessna's   largest,   fastest   and   longest-range   aircraft   and   is   recognized   as   the   fastest   business   jet   in current   production.   The   Citation   X   has   a   cabin   that   is   five   feet   longer   with   greater   head   and   shoulder   room   than   that   of   the Citation   III.   The   Citation   X   comes   with   FADEC   equipped   Rolls-Royce   AE   3007C1   engines   that   produce   6,000   pounds   of   thrust each.   The   Citation   X   also   has   a   new   technology   wing   with   a   sweep   of   37°.   It   has   a   Honeywell   Primus   2000   EFIS   avionics   suite with   five   color   LCD   displays.   A   few   notable   upgrades   occurred   over   the   production   cycle   of   the   Citation   X.   Effective   with   serial number   101,   the   electrical   systems   was   redesigned   as   a   “split   bus”   system   to   increase   reliability.   Effective   with   serial   number 173, the engines were upgraded to increase thrust by 5%. CITATION XLS+ ( 2008 to 2013 - SN 560-6002 to SN 560-6163) Cessna   introduced   the   Citation   XLS+   in   2006.   The   XLS+   replaces   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   Avionics   suite   with   the   Rockwell Collins   Pro-Line   21   Avionics   Package.   The   engines   were   also   improved   with   P&W   545C   turbofan   engines   that   now   have   FADEC installed. CITATION XLS ( 2004 to 2009 - SN 560-5501 to SN 560-5830) The   Citation   XLS   is   a   Citation   Excel,   with   more   payload,   improved   PW545B   engines   and   improved   range.   The   model   560-XL Citation   XLS   combines   a   shortened   Citation   X   cabin   with   a   modified   Citation   V   wing.   Its   two   P&W   PW545B   turbofan   engines provide   330   NM   more   range   and   19   knots   faster   normal   cruise   speed   than   the   Citation   Excel.   The   cabin   provides   comfortable seating for seven passengers. CITATION EXCEL (1998 to 2004 - SN 560-5001 to SN 560-05372) The   Citation   Excel   combines   a   shortened   Citation   X   cabin   that   seats   seven   with   a   modified   Citation   V   Ultra   wing.   The   Excel   is equipped   with   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW545A   engines   that   have   Nordam   thrust   reversers.   The   Excel   is   equipped   with   a   Honeywell Primus   1000   EFIS   avionics   package   and   has   a   range   of   about   1,700   NM.   The   Excel   offers   the   same   cabin   height   as   the   Citation   X yet   retains   the   same   short   field   performance   and   economics   of   the   Ultra.   The   addition   of   an   APU   is   an   option.   The   Excel’s   first flight   was   on   February   29,   1996.   Certification   was   received   in   1998.   The   aircraft   was   in   production   until   2004,   when   the   Citation XLS replaced it. CITATION ENCORE+ (2005 to 2010 - SN 560-0751 to SN 560-0815) Compared   to   the   Citation   Encore,   the   Encore   +   offers   improvements   and   upgrades   in   almost   every   area   of   an   aircraft   including the   engines,      avionics,   cabin   interior,   and   performance.      When   compared   to   its   predecessor,   the   Encore+      has   a   340-lb   net payload   increase   and   higher   maximum   takeoff   weight;   longer      wings   and   aerodynamic   capabilities;   and   adhesive   metal   bonding in   place   of      vulnerable   and   expensive   to   replace   mechanical   fasteners.   The   Encore+   is   powered   by   two   pylon-mounted   PW535B     engines.      They   produce   3,400   pounds   of      thrust   and   incorporate   a   FADEC   to   reduce   pilot   workload.      The   major   inspection   interval is   5,000      hours.   A   Rockwell   Collins   Pro   Line   21system   replaces   the   Encore’s      Honeywell   Primus   1000.      The   upgraded   Pro      Line boasts   single-channel   autopilot   with   dual   channel   flight   guidance   system,      3D   navigation   Flight   Management   System   FMS-3000 and   Communication   Navigation      Surveillance   (CNS)   radios.         Three   8×10   matrix   LCD   screens   and   a   Garmin   GPS   500   display cockpit      information.      The   new   avionics   suite   is      also   lighter   in   weight,   improving   the   payload   capability   to   1,170   lbs   with   full     tanks.   The   Encore+   has   a   maximum   takeoff   weight   of      16,830   lbs,   and   its   maximum   payload   is   2,310   lbs.      Its   certified   flight ceiling is at 45,000  feet.  The aircraft has a high speed  cruise of 426 knots. CITATION ENCORE (2000 to 2006 - SN 560-0539 to SN 560-0707) The   Citation   Encore   is   a   Citation   Ultra   with   upgraded   Pratt   &   Whitney   PW535   engines   that   produce   3,400   pounds   of   thrust   each compared   to   the   Ultra’s   3,045   pounds   of   thrust.   This   is   an   increase   of   355   pounds   of   thrust   for   each   engine.   There   is   no   big change   in   performance   but   engine   costs   drop   almost   20%   and   fuel   costs   drop   8%.   The   Encore   has   the   same   Honeywell   Primus 1000   EFIS   avionics   suite   used   in   the   Ultra.   The   Encore   was   certified   in   2000   and   remained   in   production   until   2006,   when   the Encore+   superseded   it.   The   Cessna   Citation   Encore   can   takeoff   from   a   sea   level   runway   in   3,490   feet.   The   required   runway distance   increases   to   5,750   feet   at   an   altitude   of   5,000   feet   and   a   temperature   of   77°F.         Not   only   is   the   Encore   quick   on   takeoff, it   is   pretty   fast   at   45,000   feet   as   well.      In   thirteen   minutes,   it   climbs   to   37,000   feet,   where   it   can   reach   its   maximum   cruise speed   of   .74   Mach.      For   a   long   range   cruise,   it   flies   at   376   knots   at   its   maximum   certified   flight   level   of   45,000   feet.   The   wings allow   the   Encore   to   land   on   runways   as   short   as   2,439   feet   and   take   off   in   3,490   feet   when   loaded   to   its   maximum   takeoff   weight of   16,630   pounds.   It   uses   a   trailing   link   landing   gear   for   smooth   taxiing   and   soft   landings,   and   can   be   single-pilot   operated.      A new   forced   mixer   nozzle   cuts   engine   noise,   and   new   fuel   heaters   have   been   added   that   eliminate   the   need   to   mix   anti-icing additives   with   the   fuel.      Other   small   updates   allow   the   Encore   to   carry   344   fewer   pounds   of   fuel   and   still   have   a   longer   range than the Ultra. CITATION ULTRA (1994 to 1999 - SN 560-0260 to SN  560-0538) Based   on   the   Citation   V,   the   Ultra   features   more   powerful   Pratt   &   Whitney   JT15D5D   engines   with   145   pounds   of   additional   thrust. The   extra   thrust   allows   a   take   off   gross   weight   increase   of   400   pounds,   39   nautical   miles   of   increased   range,   and   a   30-knot increase   in   normal   cruise   speed.   The   flight   deck   is   equipped   with   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   EFIS   avionics   suite.   The   cabin, which   can   hold   eight   passengers,   stretches   to   seventeen   feet,   five   inches   –   the   longest   cabin   of   any   light   private   jet.      The strategic   use   of   seamless   wall   panels,   indirect   lights,   and   mirrors   make   the   cabin   seem   even   more   spacious.      Passengers   enjoy the   cabins   equipped   with   individual   flat   panel   entertainment   systems   and   audio   jacks   (an   optional   feature).      The   Ultra   has storage   space   for   twenty-six   cubic   feet   of   baggage,   or   about   six   hundred   pounds   worth   of   golf   bags,   suitcases,   or   whatever   else worth   bringing   along.   Arguably   the   best   selling   point   of   the   Ultra   is   its   short   takeoff   distance.      The   Ultra   can   complete   a   takeoff   in just   3,200   feet   while   loaded   to   its   maximum   takeoff   weight   of   16,300   pounds.      Not   only   is   the   Ultra   quick   on   takeoff,   but   it   is pretty   fast   at   a   cruise   altitude   of   37,000   feet   as   well.      It   has   a   maximum   cruise   speed   of   426   knots.   The   Ultra’s   speed   can   be attributed   largely   to   its   wing   design.      Adhering   to   the   Citation   line’s   tradition   of   simplicity   in   design   and   operation,   it   uses   the fastest   straight   wing   design   that   the   Citation   line   has   ever   seen.      Two   aerodynamicists,   one   from   Cessna   and   one   from   NASA, collaborated   to   redesign   the   Citation   line’s   standard   straight   wing.      The   result   was   a   wing   with   a   large   leading-edge   radius   and   a level   upper   surface,   which   better   distributed   air   flow,   cut   drag,   and   increased   the   Ultra’s   cruise   speed   by   .08   mach   (46   knots). Each   engine   provides   the   Ultra   with   3,045   pounds   of   thrust.   The   engineers   of   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   suite   realized   the importance   of   details   like   consolidating   multiple   displays   into   a   few,   easy-to-interpret   ones   and   placing   screens   close   to   the controls   to   which   they   apply.      The   predecessor   of   the   Ultra   had   a   confusing   array   of   five   screens   and   more   than   eight   analog controls.      The   Ultra   consolidated   the   mess   into   four   sleek   screens.      The   relevant   controls   are   located   directly   on   the   screens’ faceplates to improve pilot hand-eye coordination and flight performance. Single Point refueling standard after SN 290. CITATION V (1989 to 1994 - SN 560-0001 to SN 560-0259) The   Citation   V   is   a   stretched   version   of   the   Citation   II   with   a   cabin   that   is   18   inches   longer   and   a   six   inch   longer   wing   span.   This increase   in   cabin   length   added   20   cubic   feet   of   cabin   volume.      The   Pratt   and   Whitney   JT15D-5A   engines   produce   3,045   pounds   of thrust   and   longer   wings   increase   fuel   capacity   by   167   pounds.   The   Citation   V   has   a   fine   blend   of   cabin   comfort,   performance,   and reliability.      It   is   a   good   choice   for   short   trips.   The   engineers   of   the   Citation   V   took   advantage   of   the   extra   cabin   space   and installed   extra-wide   seats   that   recline   60   degrees   and   rotate   a   full   360   degrees.   The   Citation   V   isn’t   just   roomy   inside,   however: it   has   an   external   baggage   capacity   of   46   cubic   feet   and   an   internal   capacity   of   28   cubic   feet.      In   other   words,   this   private   jet   can haul   about   seven   suitcases   and   three   golf   bags,   depending   on   the   specific   jet   configuration   and   amount   of   passengers.      Cessna spent   considerable   time   on   sound   control   in   its   design   of   the   Citation   V,   using   new   soundproofing   techniques   and   triple-glazed windows.      The   result   is   one   of   the   quietest   light   private   jets   available.   Other   notable   features   include   the   two-zone   temperature control   and   the   ventilation   system   designed   to   eliminate   drafts.   The   cabin   pressurization   system   can   hold   a   sea   level   cabin   to 23,580   feet,   which   is   useful   when   flying   at   a   high   speed   (425   knots/hour)   cruise   at   37,000   feet,   or   at   a   long   range   (350 knots/hour)   cruise   at   the   Citation   V’s   maximum   certified   flight   ceiling   of   45,000   feet.      Takeoff   distances   are   fairly   short.      At   sea level,   the   Citation   V   can   take   off   in   3,160   feet.   At   an   altitude   of   5,000   feet   and   a   temperature   of   77°F,   the   required   runway distance   increases   to   4,780   feet.   Pilots   aren’t   the   only   ones   that   can   appreciate   the   performance   capabilities   of   the   Citation   V.     Its   average   cruise   speed   of   415   knots   per   hour   makes   it   a   popular   choice   for   350   to   400   mile   trips.   The   Citation   V   is   known   as   a pilot-friendly   jet,   which   also   means   an   exceptionally   safe   one.      Its   pre-flight   check   is   easy   to   carry   out,   with   its   organization designed   with   the   pilots   in   mind.      The   jet   handles   well,   especially   in   normal   maneuvers   and   the   landing   approach   configuration.     The   cockpit   visibility   of   340   degrees   is   unmatched   by   any   other   light   private   jets   in   its   class,   and   managers   and   mechanics   alike have   repeatedly   praised   its   reliability.   In   short,   the   Citation   V   virtues   are   comfort,   performance,   and   reliability.      It   comes   as   no surprise that it is consistently chosen over other private jets in its class
CITATION CJ4 ( 2009 to 2014 - SN 525C-001 to 525C–0152) The   CJ4’s   first   flight   was   accomplished   on   May   5th,   2008.   Certification   came   in   March   2010.   Like   the   rest   of   the   CJ   family   the   CJ4 is   single   pilot   certified.   The   wing   has   been   redesigned,   compared   to   the   CJ3’s   wing,   incorporating   many   features   of   the   Cessna Sovereign’s   wing.   The   CJ4   normally   seats   6   or   7   but   can   seat   up   to   8   passengers.   Interior   compliments   include   a   lavatory   and refreshment   center.   The   CJ4   has   the   Pro   Line   21   avionics   Suite   with   FMS   (flight   management   System),   WAAS   (wide   area augmentation   system)   and   IFIS   (integrated   flight   information   system).   Along   with   the   avionics   upgrade   comes   a   Rockwell   Collins Venue   cabin   management   system   which   controls   the   entertainment   system   as   well   as   the   environmental   system.   The   Venue system   also   provides   Blu-ray   DVD   capability   with   Hi-Definition   monitors,   moving   maps   and   XM   Radio.   Williams   FJ44-4A   FADEC engines provide 3,600 lbs of thrust each. CITATION CJ3 ( 2004 to 2013 - SN 525B-001 to 525B-0409) The   CJ3,   in   size,   cost,   and   performance,   fits   in   a   narrow   niche   between   the   Citation   Bravo   and   CJ2.   The   CJ3   is   a   CJ2   with   a   two- foot   stretch   to   the   cabin   length   allowing   standard   seating   for   six   in   a   center   club   configuration.   The   CJ3   can   also   have   a   private lavatory   with   pocket   doors,   made   possible   by   the   lengthened   fuselage.   Like   the   CJ2,   the   CJ3   features   the   Collins   Pro   Line   21 avionics   suite.   In   the   CJ3,   the   copilot   position   comes   with   the   primary   flight   display   as   standard.   The   CJ3   has   upgraded   Williams FJ44-3A   engines   that   produce   2,780   pounds   of   thrust.   Certification   was   received   in   mid-2004   with   deliveries   following   shortly thereafter. CITATION CJ2 ( 2000 to 2013 - SN 525A-0001 to 525A-0523) The   CJ2   is   a   CJ1   with   almost   a   three-foot   stretch   to   the   cabin   length   allowing   standard   seating   for   six.   Like   the   CJ1   it   features Collins   Pro   Line   21   EFIS   avionics,   plus   upgraded   Williams   FJ44-2C   engines   that   produce   2,400   pounds   of   thrust.   It   is   certificated for   single   pilot   operation.   The   CJ2   was   certificated   in   2000   and   was   in   production   until   2005,   when   the   CJ2+   took   its   place   in   the production   line-up.   The   CJ2+   continues   the   “+”   of   the   CJ   line   in   adding   enhancements   and   upgraded   Collins   Pro   Line   21   such   as found   in   the   CJ3.   The   FADEC   controlled   FJ44-3A-24   engines   of   the   CJ2+   offer   improved   efficiency   and   better   performance   at altitude   compared   to   the   CJ2.   Take-off   gross   weight   is   also   increased   versus   the   CJ2.   Other   improvements   include   LED   lighting   in the cabin, redesigned seats, and updated cabin appointments. CITATION M2 ( 2012 to 2015 - SN 525-0800 to 525-0875) The   original   Model   525   CitationJet   was   launched   in   1989.   The   M2   was   launched   in   September   2011   and   it   was   described   as   a   new light   business   jet.   The   M2   is   based   on   the   CJ1   variant   and   has   similar   avionics,   a   new   cabin   layout,   and   a   more-efficient   version   of the   William   FJ44   engine.   The   M2   first   flew   on   9   March   2012.   The   Citation   M2   is   a   low-wing   cantilever   monoplane   with   retractable tricycle   landing   gear,   a   pressurized   cabin,   a   T-tail,   and   is   powered   by   two   Williams   FJ44-1AP-21   turbofan   engines   and   equipped with Garmin G3000 avionics. CITATION CJ1 ( 2000 to 2010 - SN 525-0360 to 525-0701) Evolutionary   improvements   to   the   Citation   Jet   525   led   to   the   development   of   the   CJ1   in   1999.   The   CJ1   has   a   200-pound   higher maximum   take-off   weight.   Engine   improvements   give   the   CJ1   slightly   increased   range,   better   take-off   performance,   and   a   few more   knots   cruise   speed   compared   to   the   Citation   Jet.   The   CJ1   was   in   production   until   2005,   when   it   was   superseded   by   the CJ1+.   The   CJ1+   continued   the   process   of   improvements   to   the   “CJ”   line   with   further   enhancements   to   the   engine   with   two   FJ   44- 1AP   engines   and   somewhat   higher   weights.   Also   added   is   an   upgraded   Collins   Pro   Line   21   such   as   found   in   the   CJ3.   Other improvements   include   LED   lighting   in   the   cabin,   redesigned   seats,   and   updated   cabin   appointments.   First   flight   of   the   CJ1+   was October 2004 with certification and deliveries commencing in 2005.   CITATIONJET 525 ( 1991 to 2000 - SN 525-0001 to 525-0359) The   highly   successful   Citation   Jet   was   developed   as   a   replacement   for   the   Citation   and   Citation   I.   The   CitationJet   is   an   updated version   of   the   Citation   500.   The   fuselage   is   the   same   but   it   has   a   new   T-tail   and   a   new   supercritical   laminar   flow   wing.   The Citation   Jet   is   equipped   with   Williams   Rolls   FJ44   engines   with   paddle   thrust   reversers.   First   flight   of   the   Citation   Jet   occurred   on April 29, 1991. CITATION MUSTANG ( 2006 to 2014 - SN 510-0001 to 510-0455) The   Cessna   Citation   Mustang,   Model   510,   is   a   very   light   jet   (VLJ)   class   business   jet   which   will   carry   four   passenger   seats   in   the   aft cabin,   a   toilet   and   seating   for   two   in   the   cockpit.   Like   most   other   light   jets,   the   Mustang   is   approved   for   single-pilot   operation.   The Model   510   Mustang   first   flew   in   April   2005.   The   airplane   received   full   type   certification   from   the   Federal   Aviation   Administration   in September   2006.   The   Mustang   is   a   low-wing   cantilever   monoplane   with   a   swept   wing,   T-tail   and   tricycle   retractable   landing   gear. The   airframe   is   primarily   of   aluminum   alloy   construction,   with   a   three   spar   wing.   Power   is   provided   by   two   Pratt   &   Whitney Canada PW615F turbofan engines and avionics are the Garmin G1000 package.  CITATION VII (1992 to 2000 - SN 650-0701 to SN 650-7119) The   Citation   VII   is   a   Citation   III   with   4,000-pound   thrust   Honeywell   TFE   731-4   engines.   The   Citation   VII   has   77   miles   less   range than   the   Citation   III   with   slightly   better   field   performance.   The   cruise   speed   is   eight   knots   faster   than   the   Citation   III.   The   Citation VII went out of production in 2000 after producing 119 units. The first Citation VII prototype flew in February 1991 CITATION III / VI  (1983 to 1955 - SN 650-0001 to SN 650-0238) The   Citation   III   was   Cessna’s   first   entry   into   the   medium   jet   market   and   was   designed   to   supplement   the   much   smaller   Citation   I and   II.   The   new   design   features   a   swept   supercritical   wing   for   high-speed   long-range   flight,   new   Honeywell   TFE   731   turbofans,   a T-tail,   and   a   new   fuselage.   The   389   cubic   foot   cabin   provides   seating   for   seven,   a   galley,   and   an   aft   lavatory.   The   Citation   III’s first flight was on May 30, 1979. CITATION BRAVO (1997 to 2006 - SN  550-0801 to SN 550-1136) By   1994,   the   Citation   II   and   S/II   had   been   in   production   for   10   years,   and   it   was   time   to   integrate   new   technology.   Cessna   thus announced   the   development   of   the   Citation   Bravo.   While   it   was   built   on   the   basic   Citation   II   airframe,   the   new   aircraft   was powered   by   more   powerful   and   fuel   efficient   Pratt   &   Whitney   Canada   PW530A   engines   resulting   in   a   higher   MGTOW,   faster   cruise speed   and   longer   ranger.   The   main   landing   gear   was   replaced   by   the   smoother-riding   trailing   link   configuration   adopted   by   other members   of   the   Citation   line,   and   the   standard   avionics   suite   was   updated   to   the   Honeywell   Primus   1000   glass   cockpit   and AlliedSignal   CNI-5000   Silver   Crown   panel-mounted   radios.   The   new   aircraft   first   flew   on   April   25,   1995,   but   certification   did   not come   for   over   a   year,   finally   being   granted   in   August   1996.[2]   Production   of   the   Bravo   ceased   in   late   2006   after   337   had   been produced.   An   advanced   avionics   suite   includes   a   Honeywell   Primus   1000   flight   guidance   system      This   aircraft   can   be   RVSM certified when Service Bulletin SB-550-34-70 is complied with. The Bravo can climb to a maximum flight level of 45,000 feet. CITATION S/II  ( 1984 to 1988 - SN S550-0001 to S550-0160) In   October,   1983,   Cessna   announced   that   they   would   be   improving   the   Citation   II   with   the   upgraded   Model   S550   Citation   S/II.   Its first   flight   was   in   February   1984.   The   S/II   could   seat   a   maximum   of   11   people.   The   aircraft   utilized   an   improved   version   of   the engine,   JT15D-4B &